Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 and Type 2 differences


TYPE 2

With type 2 diabetes, the pancreas usually makes some insulin. But either the quantity made is not enough for your body’s needs, or the human anatomy’s cells resist it. Insulin resistance, or lack of sensitivity to insulin, happens mainly in fat, liver, and muscle tissue cells. 

Type 1

Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes because it often begins in childhood.  Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It’s caused by your body attacking its pancreas with antibodies. In people who have Type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn’t make insulin.  This sort of diabetes may be brought on by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin.  Lots of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Lots of them stem from harm to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). Even more serious is the increased risk of cardiovascular illnesses and stroke.

TREATMENT:

A treatment plan for type 1 diabetes involves taking insulin, which needs to become injected through the skin into the fatty tissue below. The methods of injecting insulin include Syringes Insulin pens that use pre-filled cartridges and a fine needle Jet injectors that utilize air to send a spray of insulin through skin. Insulin pumps that dispense insulin as needed through flexible tubing up to a catheter underneath the skin and into the abdomen.

A periodic test called the A1C is required every three months to measure blood glucose levels. The test estimates glucose amounts in the bloodstream over the previous three months. It’s used to aid and identify general glucose control. It is the primary tool Doctors use to evaluate a patient. Glucose control is paramount in reducing the danger of complications from diabetes. The dangers are typically organ damage.  Having type 1 diabetes does require significant changes in lifestyle that include: Regular testing of one’s blood sugar amounts. Sometimes up to four times a day.

DIET:

Careful dinner planning, Daily workout training, insulin, as well as other medications are required to control blood glucose level. Individuals with type 1 diabetes, can lead long, active everyday lives if they carefully monitor their glucose, make the needed lifestyle changes, and adhere to the therapy plan.  Type 2 diabetes by far, the most typical form of diabetes accounts for 95% of diabetes conditions in adults. Some 26 million American adults have already been clinically determined to have the condition.

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Charles A. Kush III

Charles Kush - Executive, Management Consultant, Board Member, Operating Partner - Ecommerce, Digital Marketing, Internet Technology

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SMIS Blog

Smashing Mental Illness Stigma

Charles A. Kush III

Charles Kush - Executive, Management Consultant, Board Member, Operating Partner - Ecommerce, Digital Marketing, Internet Technology

Health News

Health, life and happiness

Jen's life

Behind My Smile

Road to a Healthier Life

Steering You towards a Healthier Happier Life

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