Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder


An Overview of ADHD in Adults Part 3

Living With & Managing ADHD

ADHD is difficult to deal with for everyone involved. There is not only the difficulty of coping with symptoms, but also facing the challenges within society.

For me I was 27 before being diagnosed, so I knew no other way of living, but intuitively I knew I was different then everyone else. That can be difficult to reconcile. Fortunately, I was diagnosed before I went astray. I was prescribed a stimulant, and within 30 minutes I felt normal.

Some experts have linked ADHD with an increased risk of accidents, drug abuse, failure at school, antisocial behavior, and criminal activity. But others view ADHD in a positive light, arguing that it is simply a different method of learning involving greater risk-taking and creativity.

ADHD may be accompanied by additional diagnoses or disorders, including anxiety, OCD, or speech or hearing problems. While no two people experience ADHD in exactly the same way, it helps to know that you are not alone.

Getting Help and Helping Someone

Getting help for this condition isn’t always easy, as a person may not want to acknowledge that there’s something wrong with their ability to concentrate and focus.

Some people may see it as a weakness, and taking a medication as a “crutch.” None of this is true. ADD is simply a mental disorder, and one that is readily treated.

There are many ways to get started in treatment. Many people start by seeing their physician or family doctor to see if they really might suffer from this disorder.

While that’s a good start, you’re encouraged to also consult a mental health specialist right away too. Specialists — like psychologists and psychiatrists — can more reliably diagnose a mental disorder than a family doctor can.

Six Tips For Getting Organized For Adults with ADHD

1. Start small. When it comes to organizing, one of the mistakes people with ADHD make is to try to work on everything at once.

The second mistake, is letting your space become unbearably disorganized. So the disorganization becomes doubly overwhelming, and you give yourself more reasons to avoid it.

Pick one area to clean for today and make it an area that is not too large, such as “one section of your kitchen counter or one corner of your living room.

If this is still overwhelming, think of an amount of time that feels comfortable to you, such as 10 minutes, she said.

Set your timer, and organize until you hear the ding. Timers also serve as great reminders that you need to move on to your next project.

2. Work on one small area each day, Again, this helps you avoid getting overwhelmed and easily distracted.

3. Organize on a regular basis. We don’t expect one shower to last all week, so it’s the same with organizing.

Find yourself slipping? Remind yourself that although being organized takes some time, it also saves time when you’re able to find things quickly and with less stress.

4. Shrink your stuff. The less you have, the easier it is to organize what’s left.

Some items will be easier to part with than others, while you might hold onto items just in case you need them later.

5. Downsize regularly. In addition to getting rid of the things you own, be strict about buying more things and letting clutter in your life in general.

The less stuff that comes into your life, the less you need to manage, so get yourself off of mailing lists and resist the temptation to buy those unnecessary little items

6. Keep your system as simple as possible. Having an easy organization system makes it more likely that you will stick with it, which is the ultimate goal,

These are just some ways I tried to slow down my mind, they may work for you. Sometimes the speed of life does not make some of these steps practical.

Do what works for you.

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